Smoking and Asbestos Related Disease

Facts

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  • Smoking is the single most preventable cause of death in the U.S.
  • The average cigarette smoker is 10 times more likely to develop lung cancer than a non-smoker.
  • Someone who has been exposed to asbestos has about a 5 times greater chance of developing lung cancer than the general public.
  • People who have been exposed to asbestos and smoke cigarettes have a very high risk of developing lung cancer, 50-90 times greater than people in the general public.
  • The National Cancer Institute states there is evidence that asbestos exposed workers who QUIT smoking can reduce their risk of developing lung cancer by as much as 50% after 5 years of quitting smoking.
  • Smoking has been shown to possibly contribute to common digestive disorders such as: heartburn, peptic ulcers, crohn’s disease, gallstones, and liver problems (by changing the way it handles drugs and alcohol). There appears to be enough evidence to stop smoking merely on the basis of digestive distress.

Benefits of Quitting

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  • Blood pressure, pulse rate, and temperature all return to normal within that first 20 minutes.
  • In 8 hours the oxygen and carbon monoxide level in the blood return to normal.
  • In 24 hours your chance of heart attack decreases.
  • Lung function will start to improve in the first couple months.
  • Over the course of the next 15 years the risk for cancers, stroke, and coronary heart disease will also decrease.
  • Sense of taste and smell will improve.
  • It may bring back those pearly whites.
  • Clothing and home won’t smell like smoke.
  • Shortness of breath may not be as bad during strenuous activities.

Tips to Help You Quit Smoking

  • Set a quit date.
  • Tell family and friends that you plan to quit.
  • Remove all tobacco products from home, car and workplace.
  • If you have quit before, use techniques that helped in the past.
  • Expect challenges along the way.
  • Write down your reasons for quitting and decide that smoking any tobacco is not an option.
  • Find something you enjoy doing and embrace that activity.
  • Get rid of the smell of smoke in your home and on your clothing.
  • Join a support group.
  • Change the way you do things. Use substitutes. For example, when you take a break at work instead of having a cigarette, walk around the block. Or eat sunflower seeds on a long drive when you would have smoked before.
  • If you have troubles quitting and find yourself having a cigarette, don’t get discouraged and give up. Making lifestyle changes is difficult and we all make mistakes. What is MOST IMPORTANT is that you try again and set a new quit date and plan new strategies to help you avoid making similar mistakes in the future.
  • In addition, it is helpful to address issues such as depression, anxiety, drug use, and alcohol abuse before quitting tobacco use.

Tools Available to Help You Quit

  • Chantix and other prescriptions, talk to your doctor as there are many different medications that may be of assistance.
  • Nicorette gum
  • Commit lozenges
  • Nasal sprays
  • Hypnosis (Not proven, but may be beneficial)
  • Acupuncture (Not proven, but may be beneficial)
  • Patches
  • For people living in Montana there is the Montana Tobacco Quit Line (1-866-485-QUIT). It offers: free counseling, patches, Nicorette gum, and Chantix at a discounted price. There may be a similar resource in other states.

News & Updates

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Smoking and Asbestos Related Disease Facts [VIDEO] Smoking is the single most preventable cause of death in the U.S. The average cigarette smoker is 10 times more likely to develop lung cancer than a non-smoker. Someone who has been exposed to asbestos has about a 5 times greater chance of developing lung cancer than the […] > Read More